I Must Behave

design Catherine Griffiths
and Bruce Connew
typography Catherine Griffiths
cloth, case-bound, 132 pages
121x167mm, upright
85 colour photographs
printed by EBS, Verona, Italy
NZ$85 (600 signed, numbered edition)
NZ$190 (50 signed, numbered
edition of book with signed,
numbered archival pigment
print of image #1,
129x86mm, on Hahnemuhle
Photo Rag)
Vapour Momenta Books

Available at bruceconnew.com


 

02 the book as object


The Gentle Hand + The Greedy Eye: an everday baroque practice in architecture
Rachel Hurst

six copies 2016

Body of Work Bruce Connew
2013 / published Nov 2015

I Drive You Crazy, to the Moon Bruce Connew
2007 / yet to be published

I Must Behave Bruce Connew
2006 / published 2009

I Saw You Bruce Connew
2006 / published 2007

Stopover Bruce Connew
2000 / published 2007

Muttonbirds — part of a story Bruce Connew
2002 / published 2004

On the way to an ambush
Bruce Connew
1989 / published 1999

Vekst i det vanskelige
Hanne Johnsen
published 2013

A Short History of Photography Harvey Benge
2007

Montana Estate Essay Series Four Winds Press
2002 and 2003

Cover Up: The Art of the Book Cover in New Zealand
Hamish Thompson
2008

Looking for the Local — Architecture and the New Zealand Modern
Justine Clark and Paul Walker
2000

 


I Must Behave Bruce Connew, 2009


Artist book, published by Vapour Momenta Books, the pocket-sized publishing arm of Bruce Connew and Catherine Griffiths


‘I Must Behave’ was published by Vapour Momenta Books, the pocket-sized publishing arm of Catherine Griffiths and Bruce Connew. It is the second volume in a social and political trilogy of artist books: ‘I Saw You’, 2007; ‘I Must Behave’, 2009; ‘I Drive You Crazy, to the Moon’, which is soon to be published.

Each explore themes of behaviour and control. In one, we are voyeurs on private moments in public spaces; in the other, the typography is a response to the over-arching idea of control, how it modifies behavior.

“This is an unsettling observation of the experience of globalisation: where we are, who we are and what we are, we can’t quite say. Perhaps the sense of anxiety and disconnection apparent in these images is also a manifestation of the personal and social controls and restrictions we submit ourselves to.” Deidra Sullivan


Available at bruceconnew.com



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